How Much Does Personal Training Cost in Singapore?

The cost of personal training is not fixed. It depends on the reputation of the fitness company and experience of the trainer. On average, personal training cost in Singapore costs anything from $30 to $200 per hour. Usually the ones who charge $30 per hour are newbies. Not sure if you will see any results. They are also mostly freelancers. Those who charge $200 per hour call themselves celebrity trainers. But in my opinion, they are overcharging. What is reasonable to pay is likely anything from $60 to $75 (like what I paid before when I engaged a personal trainer). Here's the URL to share in case you want to check them out too (Home)

1. Why does Quora always say my credentials could be a little more specific? I only answer questions that are related to the schooling I've had, such as weight loss, personal training sports performance, corrective exercise, martial arts, etcetera.

Do not worry about it. If you use your default credential, the Quora Credentialbot will nag you about it, particularly if someone actually reads the answer.It will also sometimes complain if it thinks you've got a silly credential, but you can ignore that too

2. Is she interested in personal training?

She's sexually harassing you and she is not interested in personal training. Unless you are interested in her, probably not, I would tell her that the personal training just is not going to work out

3. Where is the cheapest gym in Kissimmee with personal training?

Go to AOL Search - type in - Personal Training Gym, Kissimmee/Orlando, Fla. A page will pop up with a large selection for you to choose from. It aint exactly rocket science, Bubba!

4. Personal training position - should I even bother?

Im an exercise physiologist and I teach personal training. Be very careful when a gym says they will certify you esp if they are charging you for the "certification". Mostly these certifications are not accepted anywhere except at that particular gym. Ive run into people who have spent many hundreds of dollars on such certs only to have to come to me later for a real fitness cert. If you do decide to do this ask them if you will be reimbursed for the cost of their "cert". as for references, dont worry about them. Everybody starts somewhere. Since you have been taking college classes in biology and nutrition this puts you ahead of most others applying for the job in my book (I have a degree in bio chem). If the gym presses you on the references just say you dont have them because you are very new. Most reasonable people will understand. Here is a tip: when you have your interview, at the end when they say "do you have any questions for me", ask the person "what are your emergency procedures". Odds are they dont have any or they dont know what they are. You will be the ONLY person to ask this question - this sets you apart from the rest. Most gyms are very unprepared for a medical emergency. By asking this question you say to the manager that you know bad stuff happens and you want to be prepared. Speaking of which, DO GET a CPR /AED cert. After you get the job, ask the fitness direction who their "smartest personal trainer" is. Thats not the person who makes the most money. Before you take on any clients, follow that trainer around for a few weeks and take note of how they do things. This will help you a lot in "the real world".

5. Are there personal training jobs within the Military?

No...unless you consider your basic training/boot camp instructor a personal trainer. And believe me - with those folks in charge, there's no need for a personal trainer! And after basic/boot, everyone is directed to continued physical conditioning. We do not let up until we are discharged or retire.

6. Karate, Aikido, Judo. Please suggest me one?

I have studied 7 or so arts myself. For exactly the same reasons you describe, to avoid fights. If that is your aim, then Aikido would suit best. Aikijitsu second. Jujistu 3rd. Aikido is more a "grown up" style, but is quite hard to master and takes years to become proficient enough at to be like a San-Dan or Ni-Dan level like Steven Segal (Aikijitsu is actually what he does). I would say minimum 5-7 years. Everyone has there own purpose for studying. And it depends on body style, weight, and speed, as to which one style will pay off for immediate self protection results. But as far as growing with an art, for your whole life, Chudokai Aikido has been my choice, but I like to practice all the others I have studied - opponents are different sizes and change, so i must be able to adapt and modify my style and attack and defense tecnique and tactics. I did American Karate when a kid in the 70's, Tae Kwon Do when in college, then Burmese Bando (like Tai kick-box), Ninjitsu a bit, then eagle, and cobra Kung Fu, a few months of Jeet, and even some Dim Mak ! . If you want "rag doll" tossing, then Jujitsu, Aikijitsu, or Aikido might be good. They all use the opponents weight to be leveraged against themselves. And as far as "toughening" your body ? Personal training is always preferred whatever style you choose. In Aikido, you will get thrown on the mat around 200-300 times per 2 hour training session. I am hard as a rock all over. Its a lot like Judo I suppose in many ways. So, do not worry about becoming soft if you do Aikido. Ai not gonna happen if you train correctly. Aikido may be your best bet, as it teaches you MENTALLY how to stay away from fighting/direct conflict, and instead how to redirect the opponents energy against himself. And I am talking mentally in addition to physically. Aikido is a philosophy and a physical art. Thats why I like it. Its a grown up thing. And an art that once mastered can be done for your whole life. My personal feeling is that you should train in all the arts you can, starting with the most physically demanding, then as you age, progress towards those that require more mind, and less body. In other words - the younger, the more linear the art, the older, the more fluid and circular should your art become. Softer style? No, not exactly. The more linear arts break bones. Those heal. The circular arts damage the ligaments and tendons. Those rip and tear and are sometimes permanent. So that begs another question - are you ready for Aikido ? Are you ready to perhaps permanently cripple someone. If not, stay with a juvenile lick or punch style like Karate or Tae Kwon Do, wher you only break bones, which will heal quickly. Aikido, Judo, And the other "locking" and manipulative arts can be permanent to somebody. Even a practice partner. 12 people have died practicing a certain technique in Aikido because of the brain trauma from the fall. Do not let "soft" art fool you. Its one of the most hurtful and deadliest. And maybe thats why it takes 5 years to even approach becoming a little bit good at it. I t requires a big commitment. And before reaching Ni-dan we have to take on 4 assailants. But by then you have no question in your mind that you can protect yourself, and everyone around you, if it came to it, but you are also taught the mental diversions available, so that a physical fight may not even be necessary. Another thing about Aikido you may not realise, ( I did not at first), is that we take much of our training from the Bushido code, and a good part of our training is with the Bokken, and Jo staff. In other words, a wooden Samurai sword and a stick/spear. And we follow the Bushido code of the Samurai. We are in fact the decendants of the Samurai, and have a seperate bunch to carry that tradition on also. mmm. Well, thats why I chose it, and I hope that this has been insightful and helpful to you. My best wishes to you - There is a bunch more I have not covered, but I am open to any questions you may have, ask anytime, Respectfully Yours FABER

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Some health clubs that offer Pilates or other training styles that require special equipment charge extra for those classes. 4. Do they offer discounts for members on massage therapy? Do not be afraid to play hard to get, Walters says. "Many times clubs will call you back in a few days or weeks to offer you an even better deal than when you came in for the tour." And if you do not like the initiation fee or are not ready to sign a year-long agreement with your best gym, you may be able to negotiate a little. "While not all clubs will budge, many will work with you, so do not be afraid to suggest a different price or a different membership than what is stated!" Finally, when it comes to price points, the time of year you join matters too. "The best deals of the year on membership and fitness services like personal training are in January and September, so if you can wait, try to sign up then!"2. How to (gracefully) fire a personal training client?come up with an excuse like im busy3. 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